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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For me, I just absolutely love it when a home needs to have al of the plywood decking replaced.

I also notice how many companies do not replace rotted decking, because they would rather get the job done quickly rather than the Right Way.

What makes your company the most profit?

Ed
 

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The jobs that are all but impossible, scheduled so tight that there is no room for any error and the entire site has to work together. There is not even enough time to think about what you are doing, it has to instinctive... stressful but man time flies and the feeling of pulling it off is priceless...
 

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Roofing Relapse
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The answer is highly dependable. We have the most margin on repairs. Until this year we would make the same "per truck" on a repair crew vs a shingle crew. I changed that to increase our markup on the shingle work to be more in line with our other work. We do real well on gutter work. As you know we are making the push into low slope and that's because that's where we do the best!

There is no profit in anything with the word "new" in it. That being new construction, new additions etc...
 

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Repair work. I'd love to have 2 a day, every day.
Try contacting local home inspectors in your area. Ask if they do thermal imaging. These guys find a lot of things wrong on roofs. Set up some type of referral program with them, or maybe pay for their leads in some way. Home inspectors are always looking for more ways to generate revenue. We talk to a ton of them weekly.

JJ
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Try contacting local home inspectors in your area. Ask if they do thermal imaging. These guys find a lot of things wrong on roofs. Set up some type of referral program with them, or maybe pay for their leads in some ways. Home inspectors are always looking for more way to generate revenue. We talk to a ton of them weekly.

JJ
Good idea.

I converse with quite a few of them on one of their forums for some roofing advice, when needed, but never thought about putting them on my team for referrals.

Thanks,

Ed
 

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Good idea.

I converse with quite a few of them on one of their forums for some roofing advice, when needed, but never thought about putting them on my team for referrals.

Thanks,

Ed
You on the Nachi site? That is the main one that I know about. I have noticed a few guys from here and electrician talk on those boards as well. If you live near a major metropolitian area you can also see if they have any meetings coming up. I know FLIR was at their event here in Scottsdale. I am not sure what it takes to get an invite, but that would be one heck of a way to network with home inspectors.

You can try realitors also, believe it or not, that do IR inspections. We sell a lot of home inspectors and occasionally a realitor IR units.

JJ
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yes, mostly on Nachi.org with a few posts on the ASHI Inspectors Journal board.

Although the Nachi Certification seems to be frowned upon and considered just a revenue generating diploma mill by the other organizations who have a direspect for Nick Gromicko, I find their informative posts and readily access to supportive links to be extremely valuable.

I hold several posters in high regard over at Nachi, with Marcel Cyr and Brian McNeish being the two that most prominently come to mind.

Several of the inspectors also post on the JLC Forum, who I have know for several years as well.

Ed
 

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I would have to say repeat customers are what make us the most profit. It cost a lot more to gain new customers, than to retain a customer.

As far as one single type of job, it would most likely be roof restoration. Roof coatings can be applied rather quickly, compared to other jobs. A roof coating job most likely gives us the largest profit margin. As far as the most profit as a total dollar amount, that would be large re-roofing projects.
 

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Roof Pro of Vermont
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1. Deck over wide board sheathing- fast and profitable.
2. Replacing first course plywood with new plywood- installing proper vents along with new plywood. Not so fast- as nailing plywood over the top of wide boards -but easier than complete re-deck. Ventilation and Insulation problem solver- but nearly always requires staging of some degree.
3. Insulation with new roof- pop a couple sheets off and you have clear access.

Recently worked with a Contractor who worked with a Energy Auditor who thinks removing all the plywood over heated space (cathedral ceiling throughout), removing batts and spray foaming is the HO's best option. Instant hot roof- but those guys know all- ask em!
 

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Roof Pro of Vermont
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Why not Tinner? I keep one man busy doing nothing but repairs 40-50 hours per week every week. I'd love to have 2 or 3 repair guys working 40 hour weeks.
Properly done Repairs can be a very lucrative option. Even for a one man show the profits can be very high.

Our refrigerator at home stopped chilling and its four years old so we called a repairman- $180.00 later it is fine. Probably a $5.00 part and my wife said he was here for ten minutes- required payment and we were glad to pay it.

Furnace annual check-ups, cleaning a couple bills as well, plumber, ect. ect. and should be no bidding on repairs.

I would like to begin using my head and experience instead of my blood, sweat, back and yes sometimes tears.
 

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What's "profitable" mean to you?

I agree that in one sense, repairs are very "profitable" on a percentage basis.

But are you looking to make $100, or $1000, or more for the time and trouble of setting up the job and sending a truck?

In my opinion, in terms of the amount of actual profit dollars, you can't do better than running a full crew on an install.

And difficult work is the most profitable. I go in high and stay there. More than once I've been the only guy willing to bid the job, and I got paid well to do fantastic work.
 

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Slate and Metal Roofer
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I agree that in one sense, repairs are very "profitable" on a percentage basis.

But are you looking to make $100, or $1000, or more for the time and trouble of setting up the job and sending a truck?

In my opinion, in terms of the amount of actual profit dollars, you can't do better than running a full crew on an install.

And difficult work is the most profitable. I go in high and stay there. More than once I've been the only guy willing to bid the job, and I got paid well to do fantastic work.
Difficult ones are where I like to be, but I'd love a bunch of easy ones for awhile until I start catching up. I'm so booked up, it isn't funny.
 

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Wow! For me new construction is hands down the most profitable! Most jobs in my area are 25-30sq 6/12 creamers. One 4 man crew can get them done in about 4-5hrs. I easily walk away with $1000 or more. I work for 36 home builders and they are my bread and butter.
 

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Repair work, hands down. I have the highest margins on my repair work. Some days I'll knock out 3 different repairs in one day, and end up having a damn good week just from that :) If ALL I had to do was repairs I'd be ecstatic
 

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Roof Pro of Vermont
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Wow! For me new construction is hands down the most profitable! Most jobs in my area are 25-30sq 6/12 creamers. One 4 man crew can get them done in about 4-5hrs. I easily walk away with $1000 or more. I work for 36 home builders and they are my bread and butter.
Where are you and how much a square? How do you pay your guys cash, on the books or as subs?
 
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