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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When you fail to close a sale on the spot what do you leave behind?

You know anything left behind will probably shown to or given to your competitors.

You also know most of them are lazy & incompetent. So why should you do all the homework and then have the homeowner use your stuff to inform the lowball guy how they want the job done?

I’m tinkering around with the idea of leaving nothing behind. When I leave everything goes with me. The rule of thumb is only 1 out 10 “think it overs” will ever turn into a customer anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Quoting the price

When I attended a training event given by Rodney Webb recently he said the he quotes the price right on the computer screen.

He uses PowerPoint to make the presentation but he didn’t elaborate on how he quoted the price.

I’m thinking about setting up an Excel spreadsheet to use in quoting the price.

That way if I could use it total up the price if they want to add in optional items and I could automatically calculate the monthly payment if they want to finance the project.

Plus I could forget about leaving prices for all the options in writing. I would only give them a written quote for the items that they wanted included in the proposal.

I may even stop leaving a written proposal unless they sign it.

I’ve been doing this long enough to know that if they don’t want to sign it while I’m there it’s unlikely that they will change their mind over time.
 

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Roofing Relapse
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Leave behind what ever the customer is going to need to make an educated decision. Never assume you will need to close the sale on the spot to close the sale. Always be proud that what ever you leave behind will be the best of the best, and if it's not then change it so it is.

I leave what ever the customer needs to hire us. This is different for each and every customer but always will include a proposal with an explicit scope of work and exact written estimate.


If you think only one out of ten will come to fruit then you are doing something wrong... probably using way way way WAY too much pressure while you are there with them. If you EVER make a customer feel uncomfortable in any way you will NEVER get the sale, unless you make them feel SOOO uncomfortable they sign that night just so you will stop badgering them. The point is you if you're only getting 1/10th on the call-back something is definetly wrong!

I sell most of my sales on the call back and I am not the cheapest guy. I just give the customer the information they need to make an educated decision. I then also will give them the time they need because I am confident enough in my presentation, my knowledge and my own abilities that after I leave them I am the standard to which all others are held. I am smart enough to recognize that sometimes people aren't ready the first day to make a decision, for many reasons, and I just make it a point to stay in touch with them and remind them I am around until they hire me.

Infact this week I am going all the way back to 2004, with phone calls and emails to customers I have quoted and never got a sale from. Yes I will go all the way back, and I will get sales too. I have one customer I quoted in 2006 who contacted me last week for a revision and is NOW ready to go ahead. I have several I quoted in 2008 at various times through the year who we are now doing final revisions and negotiations to lock down into our 2009 spring schedule.

IMO home improvement is a Loooooong sales cycle, not a one sit sale. Sure you will sell some on the first sitting, but don't discount the customer just because they didn't sign that night. Give them a reason to remember you and want to hire you and only you.
 

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I leave everything except for my calculations and grid template diagram.

Let the other guys pull out a tape measure.

I spend a minimum of 45 minutes to 1 1/2 hours with each customer doing the Q & A presentation, which mostly consists of looking at photos and then just a glancing look at the 8 page proposal, which now corresponds to all of the problems and solutions we discussed with their photos and my photo album of similar jobs and circumstances.

Sometimes, they need time to digest all of the information, but I always require a specific date to get back in touch with them, preferably in person, to clinch the deal, which takes away the pressure type salesmanship that some others apply.

Ed
 

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put your best foot forward,If you want the customer to trust you,you`re gonna have to trust them-If you can`t ,It`s the wrong customer for you
in that case walk away
 

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Leave everything necessary. If the people are going to shop (using your calculations) leave a high waste factor ie: 28 square turns into 34, 38 ft ridge vent turns into 44). Those are the notes in scribble I might leave. Let them calculate off these and be high. This should be about a grand if they cheat...(competition) as all my info is stapled to a folder.
I roof personally and we are small so if Mr. Cheat wants to peak at these numbers he will scratch his head and question. This is a competitive market wit every slow builder turning to the must do's in construction including my Trade which is just Roofing.
On the honest side, I measure and look at the possible bad spots for decking damage and if I think there will be I drop in a couple sheets in the bid. Turn key means everything to replace a roof for a fixed dollar amount. Nowhere on my bid is any quantities.
This tactic is only to detour the lazy drive by roofers.
 
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