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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm a commercial roofing contractor in the Akron, OH area and have a large project with hundreds of seagulls on the flat roof. They had nestings and eggs throughout the roof. The eggs have hatched and the seagulls are very aggressive and swooping down on the workers. We have moved all the nests from the area we are working and installed nets across the work area so that they can't swoop down. Any ideas on how to work around this prolem? The baby seaguls are running around the different roof areas.
 

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That would be great if you had enough work. Sounds like you don't need the work, I have 12 guy's that have to put food on the table. I contacted a critter control and there is nothing that they can do at this time. I read all kinds of stories about seagulls from boiling their eggs to shooting them, problem is they are protect and its illeagal to harm them.
 

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I need the work but I did not markt he cost of seagull puncture wounds or lost time chasing seagulls around the roof into my contract. Trust me I NEED the work, but I need an injury less. I NEED the work, but I need profitable work. I don't need time lost eating away at my profit. Although I need work, I need profit more than I need work. I'd rather have the guys collecting unemployment than working for practice.

This was not part of the bid therefore it is a change order. Plain and simple. Why should YOU be liable?


How are seagulls protected? There is an abunance of them all across the world in all our areas of scrap and waste. They are flying rats, nothing more. I'm not saying I'd shoot them, that was more of a joke, but I would definetly have the customer pay for some kind of removal. There has to be a way to capture and remove them. I mean after all you have people out there capturing and removing everything else.

I'd make the customer pay for the removal. It's a saftey concern, plain and simple.
 

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If you look on line you will find that the seagulls are a protected bird because they are scavengers and help the ECO system. I didn't mean that I would work the guy's in harms way, I am taking special measures to protect the men and continue to work. If I were to asked for a change order on a project over $500,000.00 the customer would either shelve the project or put it on hold. Either way in this economical enviroment you really don't want to hold up on a project. It could get cancelled. Thanks for everyone input.
 

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Special measures cost money, is all I am saying, and if that money wasn't added into the bid you deserve to be compensated. I was under the assumption you had already started the job.

I don't care how much the job value is, if it's a $1/2 mil job but 10% of that half mil is going to be absorbed by unknowns, you are in trouble man. Maybe 10% is excessive, I don't know the nature of the project, but regardless that money is coming out of YOUR pocket, and it shouldn't be.
 

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We have alot of these in my coastal area of south Florida. I have seen people use fishing line over pool areas to keep them away. You simple put up some vertical PVC pipe, string fishing line in a criss cross pattern over the pool or work area.

The concept here is that the birds are paranoid for some reason of the fishing line, and stay away. Literally every condo or hotel along the coast has this system in place.

I don't know about the little birds or the nesting factor, but this practice in Florida keeps all the bird droppings off the pool deck and chairs. I hope this helps.

James
 

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think of creative ways where seagulls would find the area not pleasing to them already. according to my research, this is the reason for their demeanors. "The loss of cliff-side habitat to coastal development, together with the ban on burning landfill sites – providing the birds with a plentiful supply of food – and depleted fish stock have all propelled seagulls inland".. also summer is their breeding time, maybe you got an idea to prevent further population on your roof during summer time. if you're just along the coastline, then probably, your place is really a seagull friendly and you can't do anything about getting them off naturally unless you're desperate enough already.

http://ultimateconstruction.bmbnow.com/
 
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