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<P>First post here, finding some useful information here so I thought I would join and contribute where I can. But first, I, have a question, a very broad one. I am embarking on the expansion to new commercial construction, I have general knowledge when it comes to the commercial ways as I have a background in other trades in the past. I understand what happens on a commercial site and how to prepare and bid for it, what I am completely lost about is how to present a roofing proposal to a general contractor. I only know what I have learned through a month of experience and talking to contacts in the industry, but none of them actually bidding commercial roofing. I am a member of Isqft and receive endless ITB's on a daily basis some of which are exactly what I am looking to bid. I am currently bidding them and really want to maximize my time and prevent from wasting as much as possible in the process. I would really like to hear from other contractors in the industry on what they face in the bidding process. Any help is greatly appreciated.</P>
 

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Sales to GC's is way way different from sales to home owners or even property managers. You generally don't present to GC's, they don't have the time for that. Also all the time you spend putting together a well written proposal, they just look at the price. But once you can build a relationship with a few GC's, you get most of their work. They just collect other bids to keep you honest (cheap).

Bidding to the construction whores (the ones you generally get from isqft and thebluebook) is often a waste of time. They won't return any phone calls and always go with the low bidder. Then they get you to sign a contract saying "plans and specs and if there are any problems you eat it". However if you are going after public work those services are great.

Also when I bid one job I contact the architect and/or property owner and try to get a list of all GC's bidding - unless I am bidding for one of my preferred GC's. PS, if I am bidding public work I always always send to all bidding GC's.
 

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If you can make contact, one on one, with the commercial building owner it's not that hard to bid the roof. We have discovered it is actually easier that way, as even if we are bidding against a few other commercial roofers, we don't need to have the lowest bid in order to get the job.

Building trust goes a long way on commercial jobs...vs residential where they often want cheapest. Especially when we are talking 100k+ roofs. Using top quality products that you know will stand up to a non-prorated warranty helps too.
 

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As the previous responses have touched on there are two very different worlds when bidding commercial. If you purely use the methods you've mentioned and aren't building relationships it will be low bid every time, and you will pay dearly if you miss anything on the plans. The preferred method(for me) is to build relationships with building owners. As the relationship grows and trust is built you set yourself up for routine, profitable work. It's no longer a bid process at that point.

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5 Star Roofing and Restoration
www.5starroofer.com/
 

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How to Bid New Commercial

In some cases, the only thing that matters in the construction bidding process is presenting the lowest price to the owner; in other cases, the contractor's qualifications are just as important—if not more important—than having the lowest dollar amount.



try out working with property preservation companies for more work and more dollars...companies like Safeguard properties, Pk management, etc.. they have a average pay for vendor
 
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